POCER Study - Post-operative Crohn's Disease

 

Improving Crohn’s Disease Management and Finding the Cause

The POCER study has been recognised internationally for its contribution in taking medical care and scientific research forward. It guides doctors on preventing Crohn’s disease recurring after surgery and is scientifically examining the cause of recurrent disease.

A project aimed at advancing the care of patients with Crohn’s disease has been conducted in 17 hospitals in
Australia and New Zealand.

The POCER (Post-Operative Crohn’s Endoscopic Recurrence) study has focused on preventing the recurrence of disease after surgical removal of part of the bowel. It is the largest study of its type undertaken in Australia, and is the largest study on preventing disease recurrence in the world.

The clinical part of this large study demonstrated that early detection of inflammation after an operation, together with active drug therapy and monitoring the patient closely, prevents the disease recurring. This results in a higher likelihood of remaining well after surgery, and less chance of developing symptoms and the need for a further operation. This work was published in one of the world’s leading medical journals, the Lancet.

The POCER study has made some other ground-breaking clinical discoveries that have led to changed medical practice internationally. These include better understanding of who is at risk for recurrent disease and new ways to monitor patients which avoid the need for frequent colonoscopy. 

The POCER study has been widely recognised for its contribution in taking medical care and scientific research in this area forward. It has received funding and awards from a number of Australian and international bodies and charities including the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Crohn’s Colitis Australia, Gandel Philanthropy, Angior Foundation, the Gutsy Group, Ferring International award, AbbVie, and the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (GESA) Clinical Research Award.

In addition to improving clinical practice, the POCER study
has a scientific arm which aims to identify the bacteria that cause Crohn’s disease to recur. Such research offers the prospect of preventive or curative bacterial therapy.

 

The POCER study has received numerous national and international awards for its contribution to clinical care. These include:

Ferring International Award: Best international IBD study 2009

GESA Abbott Research Award: 2009 and 2012

European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO): Best international IBD study 2014

Distinguished Research Prize by the Gastroenterology Society of Australia (GESA). Michael Kamm. 2014

Premier’s Award for Health and Medical Research: Dr Peter De Cruz 2015

David Sachar International Award Mt Sinai Hospital New York. Michael Kamm. 2016

CLINICAL GROUP

PROFESSOR MICHAEL KAMM
PROFESSOR OF

GASTROENTEROLOGY
University of Melbourne,

St Vincent’s Hospital
and Imperial College London

DR. PETER DE CRUZ
GASTROENTEROLOGIST
University of Melbourne

AMY HAMILTON
CLINICAL SCIENTIST
St Vincent’s Hospital
and University of Melbourne

KATHRYN RITCHIE
RESEARCH NURSE
St Vincent’s Hospital 

SOULA KREJANY
CLINICAL SCIENTIST
Previously University of Melbourne

SCIENTISTS

ASSOC. PROFESSOR CARL KIRKWOOD
LEAD SCIENTIST
Previously Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne

DR. JOSEF WAGNER
SCIENTIST
Previously Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne

WINNIE SIM
SCIENTIST
Previously Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne

© 2017 by AGIRF 

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